“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” ~ Theodore Roosevelt

(Excerpt from the speech “Citizenship In A Republic” delivered at the Sorbonne, in Paris, France on 23 April, 1910)

I don’t know about you, but this quotation inspires me and gives me a lot of hope!

When I returned from the religious life, I felt judged by many people, including myself.

“How could I have been so stupid?”
“Why did you give all of your things away?”
“Of course you weren’t good enough.”
Etc.

Yet, I tried. And so did you.

If we wouldn’t have tried, would we have wondered the rest of our lives, “What if?”

I have my good days and my bad days. But even on my bad days I can’t kick myself for not trying.

And that’s pretty awesome.

by Pinkie.