By Rosemary Kate.

Dear Leonie’s Longing Readers, I feel like I have been keeping a secret from you, and that secret is this book.  I first heard about Hurting in the Church through a book review, and my reaction was, “I have to read this book!”  Father Thomas Berg is a priest of the Archdiocese of New York with a history not unlike our own.  He spent 34 years in religious life as a member of the Legionaries of Christ.  This priest, I thought, will have something to say to me.  He did.

Hurting in the Church is divided into three sections.  The first section shares personal stories of the ways we, the lay faithful, hurt in the Church today.  The second is a grouping of several chapters on personal healing, and the third speaks of the hope for healing the Church at large.  The book masterfully draws you in with stories that anyone can identify with in some aspect, thus providing the authority for what Fr. Berg says in the following sections.

The first part is where Father Berg shares his story.  If you are familiar with the recent past of the Legionaries of Christ, you will know that Father Berg left the community during a time of deep turmoil.  In the end, though, his reasons and the circumstances for leaving were deeply personal and unique, just as they are for each of us.  Father Berg courageously allows his wounds, like the wounds of Christ, to be a source of healing for others.  He also assists in sharing the stories of others, including those wounded by the scandal of priestly sexual abuse.  Later in the book Father Berg does not shy away from this topic, and contributes to the ongoing discussion of how the Church can move forward.  But this review is not meant to focus on that piece.  Ultimately, the connection between Father Berg’s personal journey and the journey of anyone who has left religious life gives this book a voice that particularly spoke to me, and I think could speak to you.

The second part of the book is where I found much food for thought.  Father Berg continues to share anecdotes from his personal healing, and his words said to me, “what you are experiencing is to be expected.”  I found in these pages a mirror of my own journey, a source of reflection where I could name my experiences and grow from them.  One example is on page 110:

“One of the effects of suffering a severe emotional trauma such as betrayal is the sense that our life has been upended.  Our compass seems to fail, and we lose our north. Long-held convictions about life, love, and purpose—once foundational for our own self-understanding—can be abruptly shattered.  It can give us the terrifying sensation of being held to the precipice of an existential void.  Anxiety attacks and depression are not uncommon responses to such interior turmoil.”

Yet all of this is written with the underpinnings of hope.  A few pages later, Fr. Berg writes, “I rediscovered that, at my core, my life was anchored in that experience of the love of Jesus” (p. 113).

The third section looks at the universal Church.  After providing guidance on how one can personally heal, Father Berg expands his vision and speaks of what the Church is, can, and will be if and when her members heal individually and help each other heal.  I found the first section a draw into the book, the middle a “deep dive,” and the third a gentle exit to the reality of the world we live in as well as a roadmap of where it could go.

Hurting in the Church is a much-needed book for our time, and a great tool for anyone, as Father Berg masterfully explains in his note at the beginning.  With its rich content, it took me a few months to read it; therefore, dear readers, I hope you will forgive me for not sharing it sooner.  It was only published in 2017, so I have not kept silent for very long after all.  Father Thomas Berg’s writing has been a much-needed companion, teaching me, as he writes, “the wound and how I chose to deal with it would have a lasting influence on who I would become from that point on in my life” (p. 109, emphasis in the original). I have left religious life, which, no matter how peaceful or not, created a wound in my life, and both that wound and my time in religious life will have a lasting influence on me.  With Father Berg’s inspiration, that lasting influence will be a positive one.  I hope he can assist you in coming to the same conclusion.

Hurting in the Church: A Way Forward for Wounded Catholics, by Father Thomas Berg, published by Our Sunday Visitor – Website: