Do You Love Me?


By Ignatia.

When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Feed my lambs.” A second time he said to him, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord; you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, “Do you love me?” And he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep. Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you girded yourself and walked where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go.” (This he said to show by what death he was to glorify God.) And after this he said to him, “Follow me.”

(John 21:15-19)

This passage from the Gospel of John is one of the most beautiful readings at Mass during the Easter season, and
there’s so much to meditate on! There’s the parallel to Peter’s threefold denial of the Lord during His Passion, there’s the Lord’s unfathomable mercy in forgiving Peter and reinstating his place as shepherd of His flock, there’s the opportunity given to Peter to make restitution for his sins, there’s the specific mission that Peter is given – all very valid, very beautiful points to pray with. This year, however, during my first “post-convent” Easter season, I was focused on something different when this passage came up. At some point during college (pre-convent), I had learned that, in the original Greek of the text, John uses two different Greek words for love: agape and philia. The dialogue actually looks like this:

Jesus: “Simon, son of John, do you love (agapas) me more than these?”
Peter: “Yes, Lord, You know that I love (philo) You.”
Jesus: “Simon, son of John, do you love (agapas) me?”
Peter: “Yes, Lord, You know that I love (philo) You.”
Jesus: “Simon, son of John, do you love (phileis) me?”
Peter: “Lord, You know everything; You know that I love (philo) You.”

Knowing this provides a fascinating new understanding of the text. While there is some disagreement among scholars, generally the Greek agape is interpreted as unconditional, self-sacrifical love, like the love God has for His children. Philia, on the other hand, refers to affection between friends. One reading of the Greek passage is that Peter is petitioning the Lord to accept him back as a friend and “equal” after his betrayal, and thus the Lord’s switch from agapas to phileis is an acquiescence to that bold request. But I was moved this year by another interpretation.

Before the Lord’s Passion, Peter confidently proclaimed his agape love for the Lord: “Lord, why can I not follow you
now? I will lay down my life for you.” (John 13:37, emphasis mine). After his betrayal of the Lord, however, Peter no longer claims agape love. He is humbled. He sees himself more as he truly is, and not how he’d like to be. Thus, when the Lord asks him if he agape loves Him, Peter is distressed and responds with what he’s come to accept as truth: “Yes, Lord, I love You ” but only as a friend. I do not love You unconditionally as I had once thought. Twice the Lord asks for agape love, and twice Peter responds with philia love. And the Lord finally meets him where he is: “Okay, Peter, you can’t manage agape, so I’ll have mercy and meet you at philia.”

This in and of itself is striking, and a beautiful testament to divine condescension as well as to Peter’s humility. But what I find most beautiful is what happens next: Jesus agrees to meet Peter at philia, but He doesn’t leave Peter there! In the next breath, the Lord predicts how Peter will die to glorify God. This prediction is a promise that He will help Peter get to agape! Peter had initially thought to do it on his own strength, and he failed miserably, painfully. So now the Lord, knowing his “willing but weak” spirit, promises to provide what Peter is lacking. “Yes, Peter, I know that you don’t agape Me. But I also know that you desire to. So follow Me, feed and tend My flock, and I will help you. I will provide for your deficiency in overabundance. If you follow Me, I will give you the grace to die for Me.”

I, too, am like Peter. Although it is not a perfect analogy (since leaving the convent is not a betrayal of the Lord), entering and leaving the convent has taught me a lot about my limitations. This could easily lead to the self-blame, self-loathing, and despair of Judas – “If I had only been stronger or more prayerful or more virtuous or less selfish or less prideful, I wouldn’t have had to leave! I’ve ruined God’s plan for my life because I’m such a screw-up!” – but that is not the only option. I can also choose to be like Peter, to humbly acknowledge the truth about myself and my limitations, to turn with them to the Lord in trust, and to allow Him to heal me.

The chains that bound Saint Peter, in the basilica of S. Pietro in Vincoli in Rome.

Regardless of the circumstances of my departure from the convent, the end result is that I have realized that I am not able to love the way I had thought I was. My fervent “I will enter the convent and die to myself for You!” has turned into a humbled “Lord, You have seen and know everything. You know that I love You … and You know that I do not love You as I ought. You know that I am willing, but weak. I was not able to do what I set out to do relying on my own strength.” And the Lord’s promise is that He will give me the strength and the love necessary to love Him with agape. He will provide. He sees my desire, and it is enough. He has given me a mission – to evangelize those around me – and through this mission I will become conformed to Him. Through this mission, my love for Him will become steadily deeper until I am finally truly able to give my life to Him the way that He desires – not because of my passion or devotion or fervor, but because of His. He will supply strength in my weakness. My vocation – whatever it may be – is His project. I have only to say “yes” to His invitation to follow Him and to humbly acknowledge the truth about myself. He will do the rest.

“I love You, Lord, my strength.” (Ps. 18:2)

An Unconventional Week

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L-R: Bek (Technology Coordinator), Theresa (President), and Penny (Blog Mistress)

By Penny.

Almost three months to the day after I promised to write this blog post, I am sitting down at my laptop with the resolution not to budge until it’s done.

What I set out to write back in January was a lively, cheerful account of a week spent with two friends I’d met through Leonie’s Longing, and an introduction to the video blog that we made together. Ever since then, I’ve been writing short, stilted paragraphs that have instantly hit the recycle bin (literally for the paper drafts, and figuratively for the typed versions).  What made it so difficult to put it all together as a narrative?

Plug

“Leonie’s Longing: pulling the plug on post-convent loneliness!”

I think the key is in an insight that Theresa, the President of Leonie’s Longing, had during the long drive down from Sydney to Melbourne: when you meet someone else who has been in the convent, the normal process of conversation is reversed. Usually, to get to know another woman, you’d ask what she does for a living, what books she likes to read, how many pets/kids/siblings she has and so forth, and only after weeks or months would you move on to more personal topics. But when you meet someone who was in the convent, you ask things like: “What community were you with? What drew you to them? How long had you been discerning? How did your family react when you told them you were entering the convent?” Then, eventually, you take a deep breath and ask the difficult questions: “Why did you leave? Are you still discerning a religious vocation?” And, more importantly, you’re able to understand the answers.

It doesn’t matter what country your community was in (mine was Australian; Theresa and Bek, our Technology Coordinator, were in the US); if you’ve been in the convent, you have a shared understanding of things like familial LL3freak-outs when you mention the word “nun,” the process of clearing out your former life as you enter, the experience of living such a disciplined life, and of battling the most difficult aspects of it and then finding yourself back out in the world. The part of me that hoped to become a bride of Christ is a sister to the part of you that longed for the same. In a parallel universe, we might one day have met at a seminar for religious, you in your habit and me in mine. (“I declare, ours is the only sensible one here!”) And yet, here we are, out in the world again together. We’ve walked the same road separately, and found suddenly found ourselves on it together. It’s hard to pin that connection down in words, which makes it that much harder to write a blog post about. Still, here goes!

If you read this blog regularly, you’ll have seen Bek’s “couch-surfing” journey across the United States, visiting friends from her former community. It was in about August last year that Theresa first raised the idea of making Bek’s journey in reverse, and coming to visit our two Australian LL volunteers. By November it was a fact, and in December we planned it all out in detail: she and Bek would travel around Sydney for a week or so, and then drive south to Melbourne, meeting me at the halfway-point, Albury, along the way. It’s a fair trip.

Map LArge

In Melbourne we would walk through the Door of Mercy at the cathedral, wander around the famous arcades and visit the museum dedicated to Saint Mary Mackillop, our only Australian Saint so far (though several more causes are underway). We’d also drive along the Great Ocean Road and have lunch on the beach, and then make some time for karaoke. Excellent plan. Nothing went according to it.

On the morning of the fifth of January, still bleary-eyed from a monastic wake-up time several hours earlier, I sat back in my seat on the train to Albury and sent off what is in retrospect a remarkably awake-sounding text to Bek: “Howdy! I’m making good time, currently passing through Wangaratta – how are you going in your travels? Hope you’re having a pleasant run!”

Alas, they were at that moment stuck in the McDonald’s drive-in queue from hell in Yass, about four hours out of ourPenny Bek Skeleton designated meeting place on the border between Victoria and New South Wales. They’d set out from Sydney at six in the morning, roughly the same time I’d dragged my weary bones onto a tram into Melbourne, but by the time the three of us finally converged on Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in Albury, I’d had a peaceful train journey and they were ashen-faced from a long, long drive and the prospect of more to come. This is where the invisible bond between former religious that I mentioned earlier became all-important: we met in front of Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, and six hours together in a tiny car became a mixture of singing, prayer, serious spiritual conversation, and funny-awful jokes. What the other unsuspecting folk in the rest-rooms at Seymour thought of being serenaded with O Salutaris Hostia as we compared the versions we’d learnt in our respective communities, we’ll never know.

We reached Melbourne late at night, many hours later than planned. After Mass the next morning, another part of our grand plan fell through: the Door of Mercy at the cathedral in Melbourne is now only open for one hour a week during Sunday Mass, so we weren’t able to walk through it together as we’d hoped. However, as we stood on the steps of the Door, I was able to make a formal presentation to Leonie’s Longing of a medal that I had touched to the relics of Saint Therese and her parents the year before. (May the Saints of the Martin family intercede for our apostolate, and all who visit our website!)

Theresa Penny Holy Door
Then, as Bek and Theresa had been “collecting” Doors of Mercy, it was my turn to take the photo:

Theresa Bek Holy Door

We never did get to the MacKillop Museum (next time… next time…), but we did have dinner with another ex-conventual friend of mine. Four women, four very different experiences of religious life, four different personalities, accents, and senses of humour, but with a shared understanding of post-convent life: a conversation that could only have come about through Leonie’s Longing.

Theresa Bek Penny Claire

We didn’t drive down the Great Ocean Road, either – circumstances including but not limited to a bushfire saw to that. Instead, we drove down the other way to the Mornington Peninsula, and spent the day with my mother!

Penny and Mum Mornington

(The black ship in the background is the SV Notorious, the only replica fifteenth-century caravel in the southern hemisphere.)

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Part of our intended tour of the Peninsula that day was a trip to the lighthouse at Cape Schanck, but we didn’t get there. Instead, we made a coffee-inspired detour to the lookout at Arthurs Seat, and found, not coffee, but…

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Sisters! Specifically, the Servants of the Two Hearts, whose apostolate is primarily youth ministry, and who had gone up to the lookout on a detour at the last minute just as we had. Once more, Theresa’s theory about post-convent conversations was proved correct. When we explained to them who we were, the Sisters asked us which communities we’d belonged to, how long we’d stayed, and whether we were still discerning – the kind of in-depth conversation you can only have with others who have that understanding of the religious life in common. We didn’t end up finding any coffee, but instead, something far more significant: the realisation that God was guiding our journey together, even when we were fatigued or led astray by the GPS, or the doors that we LL18thought would be open were locked, or we ended up at the top of a mountain we hadn’t expected to climb. All things considered, I think there’s a metaphor in that.

Stay tuned next week for our first-ever video blog post, made by the three of us together, on the topic of “finding community away from the community”!

The Release


By Mater Dolorosa.

A few months back I was getting up off the floor and I felt a twinge of pain in my leg. Ugh! I guess I pulled a muscle. So for a few days I iced it and heated it and stretched it. It still hurt but I got tired of taking care of it. I figured after a few more days it would go away.

But it didn’t.

As a matter of fact, it started getting worse. It was easy to ignore or forget about because it didn’t hurt constantly. But if I moved my leg in a certain way, the stabbing pain came out of nowhere and was blinding. As this continued, week after week, month after month, I started to get worried. Shouldn’t this have gone away by now? Is this something more serious? Do I have a tumor or something?

During this time, I started seeing a physical therapist about something else. She tried to get me to do a certain stretch and I couldn’t because of the terrible pain. So she stopped what she was planning on doing and focused on that crazy muscle that I had been ignoring.

Recently I have come to realize there are parts of my heart that are just like this. They are super tense and need help. They aren’t constantly nagging so I don’t know they are there. But suddenly, if I am put in the right situation, OUCH! The stabbing pain can’t be ignored.

I’ve prayed about those things here and there, on and off. They seem to kind of go away, but then once a certain thing happens again, they rear up. What am I supposed to do? Where did that come from? Why is this taking so long to heal? Why am I not over this?

With my leg, it took a while, but the physical therapist was able to find a certain position I could be in to slowly give me relief. I asked her how I would know how much I should stretch it. (I have a tendency to be a “no pain, no gain” person but this time I had enough sense to realize that was not the correct approach). She explained that I wasn’t trying to stretch the muscle, I was trying to relax and get it to release.

Release? What does that even mean?

But as I took the exercise home, I started to understand. I couldn’t just set aside 5 minutes for some stretching. I needed to prop myself up with pillows and just try to relax and let the muscle calm down. It had been in such distress for months; I needed to give it time to realize everything was okay. I had to prop it up with sturdy things. Nothing slippery could suffice. My body knew it might slip out and wouldn’t relax. And I had to lie there for a long time and let it gradually calm down. Then I needed to take a quick break, and do it again, and then a third time. And then the next day, the same thing. After a few weeks of this, it is much better, though I still have more to do.

In my prayer, it is the same way. I can’t just toss up a few prayers about these deeps hurts for a couple of minutes each day and wonder why they aren’t really going away. I need to spend dedicated time with the Lord. I need to relax and hand those things over to Him. I need to release those hurts – truly let them go. And most of all, I need to be patient with myself and my heart. Just as our bodies need time to heal and recover, so do our hearts.

How about you? How have you been able to let go? Please share your insights below! God bless you.

Friends Under the Same Sky


By Cecilia Therese.

As I transition after leaving the convent after 10 years,the hardest thing has been to miss everyone that I had meet in the apostolate in the parishes where I worked. I was at a parish for 6 years and in that time I met families, parishioners that became like family. Not being able to see them or talk to them is very heavy in my heart. Today I was reading the Bible and I came across this verse:

Genesis 31:49 “The Lord watch between you and me, when we are out of one another’s sight.” This could be a great prayer to lift up to God while we are missing them.  I also came across this : “Whenever I miss my friends, I look in the sky although I can’t see them there. But I feel happy because we are under the same sky.”

The great thing is we have a Mother -The Blessed Virgin Mary. We can ask her to keep all those we had to leave from under her mantle.  Recently I heard that a parishioner I was close with died of cancer this past month. She was 28 years old and a mother of 3 little children. I had the grace to sing and play organ at her wedding a few months ago and in her wedding she was baptized, received first communion, confirmed and made her wedding vows all in the same ceremony! It was beautiful to see her baptized in her wedding dress. She died on a Saturday (the Day of the Blessed Virgin Mary close to 3pm).I am sure Mary was waiting for her in heaven.

So when we are in those moments where we miss the convent and people we left behind, we can turn to Our Lady and ask her to be with us and with those we care about. She went to Jesus at the wedding feast of Cana in her concern and said they have no wine. She is always interceding and she is the queen of heaven and earth.  We are under the same sky as those we left. The Blessed Mother is also there. When you look up at the sky see your friends and the Blessed Virgin Mary.

“If you ever feel distressed during your day call upon our Lady and just say this simple prayer: ‘Mary, Mother of Jesus, please be a mother to me now.’ I must admit this prayer has never failed me.”
–Blessed Mother Teresa

“Love our Lady. And she will obtain abundant grace to help you conquer in your daily struggle.” –St. Josemaria Escriva

May Our Lady of Guadalupe Pray for us!!!!